A Brief History of the Chapel Building

When the Felsenheim chapel was torn down in 1914, many of its important furnishings were moved to All Souls.  These include the Cross, the Chalice, the Bishop’s Chair, the Pulpit, the Prayer Desk and Lectern, and two lovely stained glass windows.  These include the window of St. Hubert, found in the nave of the Chapel and pictured on this page, and the window with the Chalice found in the sacristy of the chapel and pictured on the "Service" page of this site.

 

The Parish House, known as the DuBois Memorial, was built in 1915, again by William Otis, using lumber saved for the purpose when the Felsenheim Chapel was torn down. 

 

In recent years walkways facilitating wheelchair accessibility were added to the exterior of the chapel.  During the winter of 2018-2019, the altar area was reconfigured to permit the priest to face the congregation.  This was done by separating the altar table from the reredos (the portion against the wall). Neither of these historic liturgical furnishings had to be replaced or destroyed; and the architectural integrity of the Chapel was preserved.  

In 1885 the Rev. George Washington Dubois built a small chapel near his home at the AuSable Club.  He named the chapel "Felsenheim," and along with Rev. Walter Lowry, led services there each summer until 1914.

 

The current Memorial Chapel of All Souls was erected by William Otis of Keene Valley on land near the river in St. Huberts.  The first service here was conducted in 1912, although the chapel was not officially consecrated until May 1916.